Common Sense Related To Humidity16 Nov

Have you ever had hot, sticky weather? Humidity is often to blame for this discomfort.
We usually refer to the amount of water vapor in the air as moisture. When the air condenses much water vapor, the humidity is high, and people will feel that the air becomes moist.
In weather forecasting, relative humidity is often referred to as water vapor in the air. It can also be expressed as the percentage value of the maximum amount of water vapor the air can contain at the same temperature. When the temperature is minus 10 degrees Celsius (14 degrees Fahrenheit), the air can hold up to 2.2 grams of water per cubic meter. The relative humidity is 100 percent, which can be uncomfortable.
The air contains so much water vapor that there is no room for anything else at high humidity. And it prevents sweat from evaporating into the air, so it’s harder to cool down when you sweat. And high humidity is also a cause of hurricanes. Places with wet climates, such as Texas and the Gulf of Mexico bordering Louisiana, are prone to hurricanes because sufficient moisture is necessary for storms and hurricanes.
In addition, humidity can cause other problems, such as mold growth in houses and malfunctioning appliances. Mold likes moist environments, especially kitchens and bathrooms that must be kept dry and clean. When moisture touches household appliances on the metal surface, condensation is easy to form, which will affect the operation of household appliances and may affect the current, resulting in a short circuit. Invest in a dehumidifier. Living in a humid environment will prevent this from happening and make your life healthier and more manageable.